Imaging revolutionized the way we look the cells

Microscopes let us shoot the fascinating mciro-world normally invisible to human eye. The scopes help us to bring small things at bigger scale. They have completely transformed cell biology, uncovering an array of complex internal structures and emphasising biological differences across multiple organisms. The earliest microscopic device invented by Zacharias Jansen in 1595 was pretty simple; a tube with two glass lenses at one end using light to give a magnification ten times the actual size. During the 17th Century magnification and image quality of light microscopes improved, but were ultimately limited by the wavelength and diffraction properties of visible light.

However, the innovation of fluorescence microscopy over the last 10 years has totally transformed how scientists use light microscopy to study cell structure. Fluorescence microscopy is a highly sensitive technique and an extremely powerful tool in cell biology, but standard microscopes are still limited by their optical resolution. Recently, however, it was discovered that by imaging individual fluorescent molecules separately over time (using special photoactivatable dyes), a fluorescently tagged specimen can be imaged at much higher resolution than previously possible. Termed super resolution microscopy, this technique made it possible to identify single molecules to an accuracy of 25 nanometers inside live cells for the first time.

Today, I really excited and looking forward to Symposium: Imaging from Molecules to Organisms @ 8:15 am to 10:30 am in Grand Ballroom B.  The topics these mornings are

SINGLE MOLECULE FLUORESCENCE AND OPTICAL TRAPS APPLIED TO MOLECULAR MOTORS: TWO CAN DO IT BETTER THAN ONE.
MULTISCALE IMAGING OF TISSUE MECHANICS.
PHOTOACOUSTIC MOLECULAR IMAGING AND ITS BIOPHYSICAL APPLICATIONS.

SUPER-RESOLUTION FLUORESCENCE IMAGING BY STORM.

I hope to meet like minded people and interact more on microscopy and imaging techniques.

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